Visualising Slavery: Art Across the African Diaspora

Visualising Slavery: Art Across the African Diaspora, edited by Celeste-Marie Bernier, Hannah Durkin, 2016, Liverpool University Press,

“Fresno 1993: Robert Barrett the curator explained to me that the Fresno Council of 100 had given Betye Saar the distinguished artist award for 1993 – In the catalog Betys Saar was described as radiant.  My notebook from the time said that I thought the word was appropriate both in relation to the artist herself and to the work on display.  During my two-hour visit to this light, airy gem of a gallery, I walked through an entrance adorned with on of her Haitian veve flags, which Robert Farris Thompson describes as ‘profoundly; liminal, standing at the boundary between two worlds.  Entering, I was immediately plunged into near-darkness; the sound of the wind circulated above a secret magical space as if high in the hills of some lost empire.  From room to room, as I wandered through the theatrical twilight and shifting space, her piece shone like stars and mini moons.”

Visualising Slavery: Art Across the African Diaspora, edited by Celeste-Marie Bernier, Hannah Durkin, 2016, Liverpool University Press, pg. 22

Whats art got to do with it?

Report Cover: Whats Art Got To Do With It?

This report offers a mechanism to think strategically as a community about the way arts could be kept at the forefront of policy discussions about the future of Los Angeles and ways to capture the ideas at the intersections of the arts in Los Angeles so that we can mobilize those ideas for the common good.

 


Whats Art Got to Do With It?
Power, Commerce and Community in the New Los Angeles
A FINAL REPORT FROM THE SYMPOSIUM
Friday, February 26, 1999
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, California

Introduction

By Robert Barrett, (former) associate vice president of the Los Angeles Convention and Visitors Bureau and Martha Harris, vice president of public relations, University of Southern California